The Summer Ministry Fair, consisting of more than 40 organizations from all over the country, will be held from Oct. 12 through Oct. 14 in the Davis Room, formerly the Family Room, located in the dining common.

According to Dr. Nathan Crockett of the Division of Ministries in the School of Religion, fall is the ideal time for camps to start recruiting summer help for the next year.

For those students who feel camp counseling isn’t for them, there are other ministries at camps such as photographer, horse wrangler, handyman and kitchen staff. Kyle Frederick, a junior Bible major said he realized he didn’t have to be a spiritual giant in order to counsel. “I was very much afraid of counseling at camp,” Frederick said, “but God used me as I was.”

Crockett stressed that by visiting the fair there is “absolutely no commitment at all.”

Both Crockett and Mr. Jon Barbrow, executive assistant to Dr. Sam Horn, said to pray about choosing from among  all of the ministry options.

Even if it’s not for you this coming summer, maybe it will be for the summer after that. After college, it isn’t nearly as easy, but while here you have summers set aside and free time built in to your schedule so these ministries are a possibility.

Crockett said many students he speaks with either during or after summer say their work was thoroughly enjoyable.

Devon Forman, a junior Bible major said camp is stretching and tiring, but he doesn’t regret his decision.

“In the end, getting to see God work both in others and yourself is well worth the time and energy spent,” Forman said.

Finances are a major reason for not working at a camp, Barbrow said, but students almost never regret sacrificing the extra cash.

“Everything that you think you’re going to have to give up, God always works to provide that and more because God can do so much through so little,” Barbrow said.

Speaking of his personal experience of working for a camp in Wisconsin after his  freshman year, Crockett recalled the Lord stretching and growing him. “On paper there weren’t tons of reasons why I should work at this camp,” Crockett said. However, he strongly felt the Lord’s leading to go.

Visiting the fair does not obligate you to work, but keep your options open, Crockett said, and listen for God to speak. Students can stop by at specified times to visit the booths, learn more about the ministries, speak with the representatives and pick up information pamphlets.