Run or Dye gets head start on conference fundraiser

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Run or Dye gets head start on conference fundraiser

Members of Zeta Chi Epsilon Tornadoes celebrate a successful first color run fundraiser. Photo: Daniel Petersen

Epsilon Zeta Chi will host its annual Run or Dye 5K fundraiser Feb.10, with events starting at 1 p.m. and the main race starting at 2 p.m.  In its second year, the new fundraiser has expanded its promotion and activities to encourage community involvement.

Following last year’s Bible Conference fundraiser, the Tornadoes will host on Feb. 10 their second Run or Dye, a 5K color run race.

More than 200 people agreed to run in last year’s 5K during a two-week sign-up period. Nathan Augustus, president of the Tornadoes, hopes for a much greater attendance, between 500 and 600 people, this year. However, he said the number could be even greater.

Although a society-run fundraiser, university executives have taken interest in Run or Dye.

Augustus said he thinks the executives noticed the support the race gathered for the Bible conference offering in an enjoyable way.

“They might have noticed the 5K was a great opportunity for people in the community to have fun, to get to know Bob Jones better and also to raise money for Bible Conference,” Augustus said.  

Tori Conover, a senior middle school education major involved in planning the 5K, said the executives’ assistance has been encouraging, along with their trust in the students.

“It’s really encouraging how much support we’ve gotten from the executives,” Conover said.

Advertising the event to the community has been done in different locations. According to Augustus, the race has been promoted in businesses, churches and universities, including Furman and Clemson.

Conover is also seeking permission from the Greenville County School District to allow practicum students and student teachers to advertise the race in local high schools.

The Tornadoes added elements to the event itself to make it more community focused.

A 1K run option is offered for kids 12 and under. Also, run times will be clocked electronically by chips in the runners’ bibs, provided that the participants have registered.

Connover said that having a race is a great way to get community involvement because of the popularity of races.

According to Augustus, Run or Dye is cheaper than the average color run. He said most color runs’ entry fees average around $60 to $70, but the Run or Dye race is $20.

“You will not find a color run that is priced as well as this,” Augustus said.

Although the Tornadoes is the primary group managing the color run, according to Augustus, others have helped, including Conover and Becca Williams, a senior class representative.

“As far as the race day goes, I wouldn’t see myself turning away anybody,” Augustus said.