Market showcases student businesses

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Market showcases student businesses

Nott will charge $6 for a 5 oz. bottle of her coffee syrups.
Submitted: Gracyn Nott

Bob Jones University’s first student makers market will be held today from 3-6 p.m. on the second floor of the Student Center. Unlike past makers markets, this event, which was organized by a student, will exclusively promote student art and businesses.

Abby Vork, a senior marketing major, is heading up this activity. A friend told Vork about a similar market held at her school, which inspired Vork to bring the idea of a student makers market to BJU.

Vork wanted to bring the opportunity to get a business off the ground specifically to students. “I wanted to have an avenue where [students] highlight [their talents] and advertise their business, sell their art, sell their products and highlight them all in one place,” Vork said.

Vork organized BJU’s first student makers market with the help of the Student Leadership Council.
Photo: Keyla Alvarado

Gracyn Nott, a freshman who is working on her second degree in business, will bring her natural coffee syrups in the flavor of winter spice to the market. “In my family, you are practically raised to be a coffee addict,” she said.

Nott has worked as a barista for a long time. She enjoys the personal aspects of the job, such as helping customers decide on a good drink.

Nott wants to use her business, Natural Notes, to give people trying to live a healthy life an alternative option to syrups that contain the sweeteners they are trying to avoid.

She hopes to sell her coffee syrups at Southern Press, a business in Greenville. Eventually, Nott would like to expand beyond Greenville, but for now, she will use the student makers market to test out her product’s appeal on students.

Likewise, Grant Hermetz, a senior business administration major, will sell bags of coffee beans, which he roasted himself, in two different size options. Hermetz, like Nott, has been drinking coffee from a young age and roasting his own for about two years.

“I’ve been drinking coffee for a long time,” Hermetz said. “It only increased my drinking habit by being able to roast my own and experiment.”

Hermetz will also bring ceramics, mainly mugs, to sell at the market. However, there will also be a wide variety of other ceramic pieces for students to choose from, including spoon rests, bowls and plates. Hermetz said he did not enjoy art much before taking a ceramics class, but afterward he added an art minor in order to take more ceramics classes.

Along with these two student creators, many other products will be offered at the event, including pottery, art, jewelry, baked goods and photography.

“There is such a wide range from jewelry and art to coffee and food, to accessories, cards and stickers,” Vork said.

And with that wide range of products will come a wide range of prices. Vork estimates the prices for items will range from $5 to $60. So, whatever a person’s budget, Vork believes there will be something for everyone at BJU’s first student makers market.