Students describe ideal society officer in light of nominations

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March 16, 2018
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March 16, 2018

Students describe ideal society officer in light of nominations

Society officers plan an outing before the Tuesday night prayer meeting. Photo: Daniel Petersen

Society officer nominations opened today. With the end of the year rapidly approaching, it’s almost time to pick next years leaders. But what does the ideal society leader look like?

Many BJU students said the ideal society officer is a person who is spiritually grounded, involved, reliable, others-focused and organized.  

According to Kayla Robinson, a freshman fashion design major in the Flames, an officer should make a genuine effort to get to know their fellow society members.

“Someone who will stop and say hi on the sidewalk,” Robinson described. “Something just as simple as that.”

Helen Wallen, a freshman science education major in the Kangas said, “An officer should always be reaching out to society mates. I think some of the officers should grab ten people from their society a week and have a meal to get to know them.”

Nicole Gabriel, a senior business administration major in the Bandits said they have to get people to participate. Gabriel pointed out that in large societies, it is difficult for officers to engage every person and interest the vast majority in events.

Katie Albert, the president of the Kangas, said the ideal officer goes beyond their job description.

Being an officer is all about balancing being the leader who sets up and pulls people in and knowing when to step back when others are ready to lead, according to Albert.

“The main thing that makes a society officer a good one is passion,” Albert said. “The secondary thing that comes out of that passionate is willingness to do anything and  a servant-mindedness.”

Abert said only a few offices take prior experience. She encouraged anyone interested to run for an office.

“You don’t have to be loud like me to be an officer, you just have to be willing,” Abert said.

Labro Loeak, a sophomore business major in Lanier said, “My ideal society officer would be someone who is godly, fun to talk with and would not have cliques in society.”

Each society is run by 10 officers. The president, vice president and chaplain are the major officers while the secretary, treasurer, chorister, sergeant at arms/media director, athletic director, spirit leader and CSC representative are minor officers.

Officers organize Friday society meetings, prayer meetings, events and outreaches.

Matthew Weathers, the student leadership and organizations coordinator, said, “Societies are a great platform for students to develop leadership skills and impact the community for Christ. It’s a platform for God-honoring relationships to grow and develop.”

To be nominated for office, a student must have a cumulative 2.0 GPA and not be on academic probation or disciplinary ineligibility.

For major officer qualifications, a student must have completed two semesters at BJU, be approved by Student Life and ideally, be a rising junior. 

Jonathan God, a senior accounting major, is currently in his second semester of being president of the Phi Kappa Pi Rams. Before being president, God was secretary and vice president.

“When I was first president, I thought whatever I wanted to do was how it was going to be,” God said. “I quickly learned that was not the case.”

“You might have an idea and have to sacrifice parts of it because it’s not what the whole group wants. You learn to delegate through the position because it’s not just one overarching person in charge.”

Typically, students run for positions that they are passionate about. Stephen Champ, a sophomore accounting major in the Razorbacks, said that if he were to run for office, he would try for treasurer because it relates to his major.

Ryan Shelley a senior graphic design major in the Spartans said he would prefer to be vice president. “You don’t have all the responsibility of a president, but you get to make a lot of decisions,” Shelley said.

For those who are interested in running for office this coming semester, the Center for Leadership Development’s website contains a vast amount of information for the specific duties and requirements of officers.